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Govt appoints N Ramesh (ITS) as DMD in Exim Bank

The Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC) has approved the appointment of N Ramesh (ITS) as Deputy Managing Director (DMD) in Export-Import Bank of India (Exim Bank)

Govt appoints N Ramesh (ITS) as DMD in Exim Bank

New Delhi: The Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC) has approved the appointment of N Ramesh (ITS) as Deputy Managing Director (DMD) in Export-Import Bank of India (Exim Bank) on Friday. According to an order from the Department of Personnel & Training (DoPT), Ramesh has been appointed to the post on a deputation basis for a period of three years from the date of his taking over charge of the post, or until further orders, whichever is earlier. Ramesh is an Indian Telecommunications Service (ITS) officer of the 1999-batch. Currently, he is serving as Executive Director (ED) in the National Agricultural Cooperative Marketing Federation of India Limited (NAFED).

N Ramesh is an Indian Telecommunications Service (ITS) officer of the 1999-batch. Currently, he is serving as Executive Director (ED) in the National Agricultural Cooperative Marketing Federation of India Limited (NAFED)

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Exim Bank of India

Export-Import Bank of India (Exim Bank of India) represents a rare case of an institution where the concept and need for such an institution had been debated for a long period-more than two decades – before it was finally set up in 1982. The Export-Import Bank of India Act was passed in September 1981 and the Bank commenced its operations in March 1982. The two decades prior to the establishment of Exim Bank witnessed significant changes in the industrial and the trade scenario. Indian exports during the fifties and the early sixties consisted of primary commodities and traditional manufactures like jute and cotton textiles. The dominant viewpoint was that in India’s case, expansion in domestic demand alone could realistically serve as the engine for economic growth, since export expansion opportunities were limited and there were fundamental constraints (like inadequate infrastructure) to export growth.

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