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Video showing a tigress in hot pursuit of a tourist vehicle in Maharashtra goes viral

PW Bureau

The three-and-a-half-year-old tigress ‘Chhoti Madhu’ was believed to have got agitated by the proximity of the visitors’ vehicle New Delhi: A video of a tigress chasing a tourist vehicle in the buffer zone of a tiger reserve in Maharashtra as tourists scream has gone viral on the Internet. The video has been shot in the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve in Chandrapur district and has led to widespread concern among wildlife activists who have been asking the government to lay down directives for tour operators and tourists to avoid any mishaps.

This is the second incident when the tigress has charged at a tourist vehicle. After the earlier incident, a meeting of tourist guides and drivers was convened and the particular stretch of road in the forest was closed to visitors for a week.

Range Forest Officer Raghvendra Moon said the incident occurred on November 11 after the three-and-a-half-year-old tigress ‘Chhoti Madhu’ got agitated by the proximity of the visitors’ vehicle. At one point in the clip, the tigress is seen barely metres away from the vehicle as the tourists scream and try to capture a video. This is the second incident when the tigress has charged at a tourist vehicle. After the earlier incident, a meeting of tourist guides and drivers was convened and the particular stretch of road in the forest was closed to visitors for a week. A warning was also issued to keep a safe distance from tigers. Maharashtra has six tiger reserves which cover an area of around 9,116 sq km. They include Pench, Melghat, Sahyadri and Tadoba-Andhari, which attract wildlife enthusiasts in large numbers.